Technical LibraryArticle: JMAG A to Z

Evaluating Results and Viewing Models from A to Z

Have you mastered JMAG?
JMAG continues to evolve with each passing day. There may be functions in JMAG that are unknown even to those who are already using it. There are also most likely some useful procedures that are not well known yet. Why don't we aim at making operations more efficient by becoming familiar with new functions and procedures that we don't know about?
In this series, I would like to introduce "Things that we should know" in JMAG.

Overview

JMAG supports results evaluations through a variety of post functions. The reason for this is that it reduces the effort that goes into organizing results as much as possible, and we wanted our clients to be able to create shapes for better design proposals quickly.
By all means, use this as an opportunity to take advantage of JMAG's post function, which can multilaterally evaluate and analyze results.

A Convenient Viewing Method for Confirming the Amount of Distribution

I would like to introduce a useful function for confirming the distribution amounts that are output in JMAG in contour plots and vectors.

Cut-Plane

It can handle the physical phenomena that occur inside of an appliance because it is a simulation.
With JMAG, by creating cut-plane of the model in a location of your choosing, you can confirm results in parts that you cannot see. There are two types of cut planes: A "Cut Plane," which you can create as you wish, and a "Cylindrical Plane," which creates a plane of the cylindrical area (See Fig. 1). It is also possible to use them in combination. It is easy to switch between hiding and displaying the cut plane, and to display it by itself, as well.
The steps for creating a cut plane are as follows:

  1. Right-click on [Cut Planes] under [Model] in the [Treeview] tab.
  2. Click on [New Cut Plane].
  3. Enter a title, specify a location for the cut plane, select a display type, and click [OK].

Fig. 1 Cut plane display (Above: Cut plane, below: Cut cylinder)
Fig. 1 Cut plane display (Above: Cut plane, below: Cut cylinder)

Model Copy

If you want to display the results analyzed from a partial model in a full model, use the Model Copy function.
In JMAG you can copy contour plots and vectors (See Fig. 2). There are two types of copies: "Mirror Copy" and "Rotation Copy." The model copy settings are applicable to all of the cases that were created by parametric analysis.
By carrying out the copy settings by following the steps below and clicking the [Model Copy Display] button, you can display the copy.

  1. Right-click [Model Copy] in the [Treeview] tab and select [Edit Model Copy].
  2. Select the part to copy.
  3. Specify the copy type.
  4. Click [OK].

Fig. 2 A full model display via model copy.
Fig. 2 A full model display via model copy.

Multiview

If you want to carry out factorial diagnosis while comparing with different diagnosis results, use the multiview function.
With JMAG, you can split the model view window into several windows and display them (See Fig. 3).
Thanks to this, as with iron loss analysis and vibrational analysis, studies and factor comprehension become easy.

Fig. 3 Vibrational analysis factor comprehension using Multiview
Fig. 3 Vibrational analysis factor comprehension using Multiview

Animation

If you want to display each step and each phase of the analysis results in succession, use the animation display.
In JMAG, you can display animations of contour plots and vectors. For transient response analysis you can confirm each step, and for frequency response analysis you can confirm each phase. The settings for playing speed and steps to use it are also simple. You can also export the animation to a file.
It takes just a single click to run and import it. For the animation, click the "Play" button on the animation control bar, and to import it click [Export Animation] in the [File] menu.

Graph Conversion in the Graph Manager

In JMAG it is possible to display several types of graphs, such as history graphs and section graphs, but it is also possible to display graph conversions instead of simple graphs.
Graph conversions are carried out in the Graph Manager. By using the Graph Manager you can confirm point sequence data, in addition to performing more basic tasks such as combining graphs and freely matching several of them up for a comparison.
I would like to introduce the convenient way of using the Graph Manager.

Fourier Transform

To carry out analysis of the frequency components of magnetic flux density and electromagnetic force, use the Fourier Transform function.
JMAG's Fourier Transform function uses frequency spline interpolation. By adding data, you can use point sequences from results other than those obtained in JMAG (See Fig. 4).
The steps for Fourier Transform are as follows:

  1. Choose the data set that carries out the Fourier Transform in the Graph Manager.
  2. Click on [Transform] and select [Fourier Transform].
  3. Specify the display method and scope and click [OK].

Fig. 4 Analysis of the frequency components of the electromagnetic force in the tips of the teeth of an SR motor.
Fig. 4 Analysis of the frequency components of the electromagnetic force
in the tips of the teeth of an SR motor.

Combining Graphs

To confirm the correlation of similar physical quantities such as flux linkage and current value or X and Y components in magnetic flux density, combine the graphs.
You can select the items to determine the parameters of the X and Y axes from several data sets and create a new data set (See Fig. 5).
The steps for combining graphs are as follows:

  1. Select the data set to use as the X-axis from the Data Manager.
  2. Select the data set to use as the Y-axis while holding down the [Ctrl] key.
  3. Click [Transform] and select [Combine].
  4. Carry out the axis settings and mapping, and click [OK].

A Wide Variety of Graph Displays

It is also possible to select various graph displays and options from history graphs that display the histories of point sequence data. I would like to introduce a multifaceted evaluation method and a display method that makes things easier to see.

Skew Graphs

Skew occurs when the motor stator or the magnet is tilted at an angle in the direction of the axle in order to suppress torque pulsation. A skew graph is a function that expresses the skew effects by superimposing the 2D analysis results. (See Fig. 6). We integrate physical quantity graphs that were obtained when moving models without skew by using the specified method. The output items that it supports are: Torque, current, voltage, and electromagnetic force.
The steps for creating a skew graph are as follows:

  1. Right-click [History Graph] under [Analysis Results] in the treeview, select the output parameters and display the graph.
  2. Select [Skew Graph] under [Calculation] in the [Graph] dialog box.
  3. Set the angle for the skew angle and for a single revolution.
  4. Click [OK].

Fig. 6 It is possible to confirm the presence of skew due to changes in torque in the graph.
Fig. 6 It is possible to confirm the presence of skew due to changes in torque in the graph.

Response Graph

To combine the response values output from several cases of parametric analysis into a single graph, use the response graph. By doing this, it is possible to easily confirm changes in the response values of evaluation items against design variables.
Comparisons that process the results of average values, max./min. values, and intensity are simple as well, so it is also possible to achieve N-T curve renderings within JMAG, (See Fig. 7).
The steps for creating a response graph are as follows:

  1. Display the graph of the response value that you wish to confirm.
  2. Select [Response Graph Data] from [Calculation] under the [Graph] dialogue box, and define the title and calculation method.
  3. Register the response values in the [Table] dialog box.
  4. Right-click on [Graph] under [Analysis Results] > [Response Graph] and define values for the X-axis and Y-axis in the [Response Graph] dialog box.
  5. Click [OK].

Fig. 7 An N-T curve showing a calculation of the average torque values from several cases obtained through parametric analysis and displays them combined into a single graph.
Fig. 7 An N-T curve showing a calculation of the average torque values
from several cases obtained through parametric analysis and displays
them combined into a single graph.

Graph Options for Averages and Intersection Displays

With JMAG, it is possible to find out average values and values of intersections with reference lines on a graph without using spreadsheet software.
To make values of averages and intensities appear in a graph, simply click "On" in the checkboxes for [Average] and [Intensity] in the [Line Options] tab. And by specifying the reference line the intersection coordinates will appear on the graph, as well (See Fig. 8).
It is also simple to set things like line symbols and titles for history graphs.
The confirmation methods for values of intersections that use reference lines are as follows:

  1. Click the [Edit] button in the [Graph] tab.
  2. Click "On" in the [Reference Line] check boxes under the X-axis or Y-axis in the [Graph Properties] dialog box and enter values.
  3. Click [Apply] or [OK].

Fig. 8 The coordinates for the intersection with the reference line appear in the lower right.
Fig. 8 The coordinates for the intersection
with the reference line appear in the lower right.

Analysis Reports

The process does not end when the results from electromagnetic field analysis have been obtained. There are many things that one should do post analysis, such as comparing analysis results and creating reports that include the analysis settings.
With JMAG, it is possible to confirm analysis settings and results in a single report (See Fig. 9), one can also response graphs and design variables for each case when carrying out parametric analysis. There is also a message browser that allows a person to confirm messages that are output when the analysis ends, as well as solver reports that display models in addition to the convergence of, and time taken for, calculations. Use it according to your objective.
The steps for setting output items for reports and for displaying reports are as follows:

Steps for setting output items:

  1. Right click [Report] in the treeview.
  2. Select [Properties] and display the [Report Properties] dialog box.
  3. Select "On" in the check boxes for items that are going to be output from the column to the report.
  4. Click [OK].

Steps for displaying a report.

  1. Right click [Report] in the treeview.
  2. Select [Case Report].
  3. A report is created based on the contents set in the [Report Properties] dialog box, and it is displayed in the graphics window.

Fig. 9 An analysis report
Fig. 9 An analysis report

Model Display Changes Via Keyboard and Mouse Operation

It is necessary to change the model display by rotating, expanding, and shrinking it when setting the materials and conditions. It is possible to change the model display by using the tool button, but in JMAG, one can change the model display by operating the keyboard and mouse alone. Whether you use the tool button or operate the mouse and keyboard is your preference, but this will allow a person to reduce their number of clicks, so by all means give it a try.
The method for changing a model display by using the keyboard and mouse is a follows:

Zoom

Rotate the mouse wheel back and forth.

Rotating It Relative to the Center of the Graphics Window

Drag it while pressing down on the mouse wheel.

Rotating It Relative to a Point in the Graphics Window

Press down on the mouse wheel on the location that you want to make the center of rotation and drag it while holding down the [Shift] button.

Rotating It Relative to the Center of the Model

Drag it while pressing down the mouse wheel and holding down the [Ctrl] key on the keyboard.

Panning

Drag it while pressing down the mouse wheel and the right mouse button.

Shortcut Keys That are Actually Useful

We have prepared various shortcut keys for JMAG operations, as well. I would like to introduce a part of the shortcut keys for JMAG-Designer (See Table 1). See the JMAG Users' Manual for more information.

Table 1 JMAG-Designer's shortcut keys.
Table 1 JMAG-Designer's shortcut keys.

In Closing

I have taken this opportunity to introduce several result display methods as well as useful model display methods. The explanations of the operation methods were long, and there may be some who have doubts about whether they will lead to more efficient operations, but learning simple methods is a shortcut to reducing time and cost. It would be wonderful if everyone could learn these more convenient functions and operation methods, getting to be able to use JMAG more effectively.
Next time I plan to introduce an A to Z for calculations. Be sure not to miss it.

Mini CornerHow Do I Fix Problems That I Am Having With JMAG?

Has everyone here ever experienced a problem when using JMAG? What do you do in those situations?
You may be using independent methods such as asking a JMAG user nearby, asking customer support, just thinking about it, or maybe even giving up.
We here at JMAG provide various types of support services to help solve any problems that you may be experiencing. I would like to introduce support services that you should know for every situation when using JMAG.

Problems when you are just starting to use JMAG
You have assembled a usage environment for JMAG. So, what should you do next?
We have prepared a "Self Learning System" (Referred to from here on as "SLS") for those just starting to use JMAG. This makes it possible to learn the way of thinking behind modeling and the conditions while getting experience in the basic analyses in JMAG. The procedure for setting up SLS is as follows:

  • Start Menu > JMAG-Designer > Documents > Self Learning System
  • JMAG Menu bar > Help > Self Learning System
  • JMAG Website > Support > Self Learning System

We are also conducting seminars for beginners for those who would like to learn from an instructor instead of doing it on their own. See the JMAG Website for more information on the contents and schedule.

JMAG Website: http://www.jmag-international.com/
JMAG Support inquiries: jmag-support@sci.jsol.co.jp





Contents

Issue 11 Electric Field Analysis from A to Z
Issue 10 Structural Analysis from A to Z
Issue 9 Understanding Thermal from A to Z
Issue 8 Understanding Conditions from A to Z
Issue 7 Understanding Conditions from A to Z
Issue 6 Understanding Geometry Modeling from A to Z
Issue 6 Understanding Geometry Modeling from A to Z
Issue 4 Understanding Meshes from A to Z
Issue 3 Shortening Calculation Time from A to Z
Issue 2 Evaluating Results and Viewing Models from A to Z
Issue 1 Running Multiple Case Calculations from A to Z

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